The Cool Hunter - Mike Hewson - Public Installation - New Zealand

Oh goodness. Brilliant. Love it. Temp art installation post-Christchurch earthquake in 2011.

(via Rural Underground: City Pops Up Beneath a German Field | WebUrbanist)

(via Rural Underground: City Pops Up Beneath a German Field | WebUrbanist)

The Edible City (by ASLA) via Urban Reforestation

Occupy Vacant Lots promotes urban farming initiative : The Temple News
The Science of Quieter Cities - Design - The Atlantic Cities

(via The Science of Quieter Cities - Design - The Atlantic Cities) - found on twitter via @Brainpicker

William H. Whyte: The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces - The Street Corner (by MAS)

A must-see for anyone interested in the design of engaging and functional civic spaces. If you’re short on time, I’d say the key message is: people interact around places they can sit!

Vertical public space?

Meditating on this concept for future cities. Found this, from Korea:

 (via Spiral Garden: A Self-Sufficient, Public Vertical Green Space For Cities @PSFK)

From the designers:

‘We wanted to build a new environmentally-friendly town where the environment is considered as an important part of everyday life. We propose ‘Spiral Garden System’: a public sustainable place like a green heart, easy to maintain and self-sufficient, created by a joint population that will stimulate social interaction among neighbours. A light, spiral structure protected by a transparent and suggestive mesh, the project encourages the city to create sustainable exchange spaces in different ways. This spiral contains an ascending garden where native vegetation can coexist with urban orchards, shared and planted for the neighbours for easy maintenance and serving also as a green outdoor walk. ‘Spiral Garden System’ increases social interaction between people, provides a place for exchanging natural products, and becomes a way for local residents to get involved with their neighbourhood. To sum up, we propose an ecological project in a way to give sustainable change to daily city lives, where humans and nature can coexist.’


via PSFK .
Tapis Rouge! A Grass Carpet for a French Town, Jaujac

You may have seen this already as it does the interwebs rounds.

Incredibly simple, effective and engaging installation!

Tapis Rouge! by Gaelle Villadary

Tapis Rouge! by Gaelle Villadary

Last Fall, French artist Gaëlle Villedary installed a nearly 1400 foot long grass carpet through the town of Jaujac, France for an installation entitled “Tapis Rouge!” (“Red Carpet”). The installation marked the 10th anniversary of the town’s Art and Nature trail. To see the entirety of “Tapis Rouge!”, see this fast motion walkthrough:

via Designboom & Hypenotice & Landezine

(via Who to Believe, a Giant Optical Illusion Outside Paris City Hall)

“Who to Believe” by French artist François Abelanet is a large scale optical illusion installed outside the Paris City Hall. When viewed from a specific angle, the 100 meter long grass installation appears to be a much smaller three-dimensional sphere. This French language video by Paris.fr shows how the installation was built.

Via The AGE: Greener on the other side | Home Base | parks in cities

The Age has an article addressing the lack of parks an open spaces in Melbourne, as a result of poor planning over the past century or so.

It was interesting, being at the City of Melbourne’s public consultation for the parks and open spaces strategy, to see how much participants prioritised the larger colonial parks to meet wellbeing and mental health needs. It seemed these priorities completely trumped needs for green spaces and smaller, distributed parks within the city to mitigate heat island effects and increase biodiversity.

I understand that the old survey question on priorities has its limitations, but it’s still quite something to see what people put first. Considering that it’s pretty unrealistic to unlock large multi-hectare sites within the city boundary; perhaps it is harder to imagine what smaller but more frequent greenspace forms might look like in the CBD and surrounding inner burbs.

Also because I imagine the impact of a heat island and lack of urban biodiversity may have more adverse effects on general mental health than people might first consider!

I think we have to look at vegetation, and the ecological functions of vegetation in cities way beyond the current paradigm. As density increases, ways of similarly increasing density and distribution of greenspace over roofing, walls and interstitial spaces is necessarily a priority - the way I see it!

See potential: art interventions for transforming perceptions

I like this Kickstarter project. I would love to replicate the basic premise of this project here, in Melbourne.

Where I am, in Ascot Vale - and I see a lot in the inner north, are vacant sites which sit waiting for development and neglected. What if before these sites get purchased for development, they could instead function as awareness raisers - and be put to use in revitalising and reactivating localities as the hubs (activity centres) that councils and residents wish them to be?

Could it have the power to influence how locals see site value? How it can improve sense of community, and say, reduce needs to travel for food? Or what about all the lifestyle and amenity value that transforming these sites into food hubs, gardens or playspaces could provide?

See Potential uses documentary photographs to pre-visualize a better future. In the South Side of Chicago, a lack of access to affordable, healthy foods is holding a community captive to circumstance. With the tools available to us today, urban decay is an opportunity for self-sufficiency to blossom. We (the community) can create self-sustaining, hyperlocal systems to cultivate well-being in systemically neglected communities.

In partnership with Orrin Williams, the founder and director of the Center for Urban Transformation (CUT) [http://www.cutchicago.org/], we will use public art as a platform to transform urban blight into community engagement.

We will work with community leaders and local artists to create large-scale photographic installations to portray redevelopment strategies for a transformed landscape. These installations will inspire and mobilize the community to redirect their attention towards simple, holistic solutions that reframe our relationships with food — and consequently, life.

Having a vision for a better future is the first step towards creating a positive change in our lives.

“In order to transform communities, you need to get rid of the vacancy. Only then can you change people’s ways of seeing and imagining their neighborhoods.” -Orrin Williams, Founder & Director, Center for Urban Transformation.

Popups, temporary materials. That’s a lot of plastic cable tie for a short-lived effect though?
(via Plastic Pop-Up Bar Built From Old Recycled Tubing [Pics] Pop-Up Bar Built From Blue Tubing [Pics] – @PSFK)

Popups, temporary materials. That’s a lot of plastic cable tie for a short-lived effect though?

(via Plastic Pop-Up Bar Built From Old Recycled Tubing [Pics] Pop-Up Bar Built From Blue Tubing [Pics] – @PSFK)

An underground park from an abandoned station!? The ultimate interstitial regeneration. via

kickstarter:

Everyone knows about The High Line, New York City’s experiment with an elevated park. It’s awesome, and a great example of reclaiming public spaces. The LowLine is quite similar. Beneath Delancey Street on the Lower East Side, there is a long forgotten about train depot. It’s massive and has been neglected for decades. Now, a team  of designers are gearing up to try and transform the derelict depot into a stunning, underground park for all to enjoy. Consider the LowLine the ying to the High Lines’ yang. We like that, and so it is Project of the Day!

An underground park from an abandoned station!? The ultimate interstitial regeneration. via

kickstarter:

Everyone knows about The High Line, New York City’s experiment with an elevated park. It’s awesome, and a great example of reclaiming public spaces. The LowLine is quite similar. Beneath Delancey Street on the Lower East Side, there is a long forgotten about train depot. It’s massive and has been neglected for decades. Now, a team  of designers are gearing up to try and transform the derelict depot into a stunning, underground park for all to enjoy. Consider the LowLine the ying to the High Lines’ yang. We like that, and so it is Project of the Day!

good:

A ‘Vertical Greenhouse’ Could Make a Swedish City Self-Sufficient
The future of urban farming is under construction in Sweden as agricultural design firm Plantagon works to bring a 12-year-old vision to life: The city of Linköping will soon be home to a 17-story “vertical greenhouse.”
Check out the story on GOOD.is→ 

good:

A ‘Vertical Greenhouse’ Could Make a Swedish City Self-Sufficient

The future of urban farming is under construction in Sweden as agricultural design firm Plantagon works to bring a 12-year-old vision to life: The city of Linköping will soon be home to a 17-story “vertical greenhouse.”

Check out the story on GOOD.is 

Project ‘Map’, by Aram Bartholl draws attention to the increasing influence of geolocation services by transposing the google place marker onto the real world.

In the city center series ‘Map’ is set up at the exact spot where Google Maps assumes to be the city center of the city. Transferred to physical space the map marker questions the relation of the digital information space to every day life public city space.

Project ‘Map’, by Aram Bartholl draws attention to the increasing influence of geolocation services by transposing the google place marker onto the real world.

In the city center series ‘Map’ is set up at the exact spot where Google Maps assumes to be the city center of the city. Transferred to physical space the map marker questions the relation of the digital information space to every day life public city space.